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Biografie  Erwin Schrott gehört zu den faszinierendsten Sängern unserer Zeit und gilt allgemein als der gegenwärtig beste Interpret der großen Mozart-Partien Don Giovanni, Leporello und Figaro. Der Bassbariton Erwin Schrott wird längst an den international renommiertesten Opernhäusern der Welt gefeiert, wie unter anderem der Mailänder Sca...weiterlesen

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Biografie  Erwin Schrott gehört zu den faszinierendsten Sängern unserer Zeit und gilt allgemein als der gegenwärtig beste Interpret der großen Mozart-Partien Don Giovanni, Leporello und Figaro. Der Bassbariton Erwin Schrott wird längst an den international renommiertesten Opernhäusern der Welt gefeiert, wie unter anderem der Mailänder Sca...weiterlesen

Repräsentationsdetails:

Ariosi Management Sagl
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  • Repertoire (14)
Komponist*in & WerkRolleProduktionen
Alagna
Le dernier jour d'un condamnébajo1
Bellini
I puritaniNo role1
Sir Giorgio1
Berlioz
Les Troyens à CarthageNarbal1

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If you perform Puccini, and Tosca even more, you’re sure of success. The Theatre Comunale di Bologna makes this choice to close the 2017 season, and they guarantee a sold out show and applause by choosing the masterpiece of the genius of Lucca. Originally, it should have been Aziz Shokhakimov as the conductor, but later they decided to call Valerio Galli. He’s an expert on Puccini. Yes, we know, there was good singers also, but the quality of the orchestra’s sound, the timbre research, and the beautiful theatre’s choir deserve a standing ovation just for him. Furthermore, the orchestra and the choir were capable of doing amazing things–the cohesion between musician and singers in front or behind the stage was remarkable–and we know how hard Puccini’s score is. The rest of the show was not so good. Rudy Park was the Cavaradossi character. The Korean tenor was terrific, with his dark voice, he looked like a baritone with a tenor range, and he had a prodigious vocal technique, homogeneous in both the high and the low pitch, expressive both in the piano and in the forte, but unfortunately the audience did not seem so enthusiastic at the end of E Lucevan Le Stele. Do you remember when a famous tenor of the past brought the house down? None of this. It was a simple applause, just because now we are accustomed to applauding. What a pity, as he had such a beautiful voice! A great singer and wonderful actress was Svetla Vassilleva. She was at first capricious, then passionate and overwhelming, and finally tragic. Tosca wore a splendid red dress at first, then a flowered dress, which brought out charm and beauty. With a soprano, the audience wants to dream. Vissi d’Arte was perfect, strong, and passionate. Too bad, as the audience was too quiet that night, and distracted by Christmas shopping, the applause wasn’t loud enough. Gabor Bretz was Scarpia, and his makeup looked like a vampire’s. As Scarpia (the bad guy of the story), he was very tall, and his presence aroused terror at the sight only. A perfect actor for that role, Scarpia’s costume resembled a 20’s Italian style uniform, like that of the policemen. His interpretative ability and his stage presence were quite extraordinary. His voice was probably the better of the show, and his character is the one who most convinced the audience. The set design and direction did not impress the spectators. The costumes were 20’s style for some characters, timeless for others. High, white columns, a large rotating platform, and video projections are the key elements of the stage design, which symbolize a Rome, not so realistic. Stylized Roman architecture set the stage. It is like a card game, it’s something that always works. Regret remains, as we see Tosca die of heartbreak. It’s not better, if she, chased by the cops who find the corpse of Scarpia, shouts “O Scarpia, forward to God!” throwing herself from the castle ramparts. I think the audience will always wait for this, and when there is not a little bit of disappointment, it is always perceived (even in this show performed one week before Christmas). In conclusion, it was a good show without twists, but can Tosca one day surprise us again?
Simon Orfila, who debuted at the Colón as Dulcamara (L’elisir d’amore) this time last year, was an outstanding Leporello, firm voiced and with the right degree of servility but without the simpleness that is sometimes shown to bolster the humour. American tenor Jonathan Boyd was a rounded Don Ottavio, sympathetic and scholarly in his bearing. Less satisfactory, however, were the leading ladies. Paula Almerares as Doña Ana, although acting well was uneven. María Bayo as Doña Elvira, although showing no diminishment of power, is not up to her former level vocally. She looked also, as she was made up, more like someone of Don Giovanni’s mother’s generation than a young lover, which gave an interesting twist to their respective tastes. As the peasant Masetto and his new bride Zerlina, Mario De Salvo and especially Jaquelina Livieri gave noteworthy performances. So too did Lucas Debevec Mayer as Doña Ana’s father and the Comendatore – but unfortunately we saw all too little of him as in one of the more curious aspects of the production, there was no statue in the cemetery or at the final dinner – just an amplified voice from above. Indeed the cemetery itself consisted only of a ‘wall’ of tombs and when Leporello addressed the Comendatore it was offstage to the back. So while the production was memorable for the singing, it was also – although for the wrong reasons – for the staging from director Emilio Sagi and scenographer Daniel Bianco. As if viewing a picture, it was contained within – but at times outside – a giant picture frame, along with an almost unchanging backdrop. Though this general setting wasn’t modern in appearance, the dress was – and perhaps most bizarre of all was the final scene with what appeared to be the breaking up of pieces of cake into crumbs on to Don Giovanni’s lifeless body atop the dining table. Marc Piollet led the orchestra with energy and passion, and the chorus sung well, the last moments from the orchestra pit.
Jonathan Spencer Jones

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