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Biografie  "If there were a futures market for classical music, the touts would be pushing Lidiya Yankovskaya." -WBUR Russian-born symphonic and opera conductor Lidiya Yankovskaya's recent work has been hailed as “superb,” “expert,” and “coax[ing] every possible expressive note from the instrumentalists.” Recently named Music Director of...weiterlesen

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TACT International Art Management

Biografie  "If there were a futures market for classical music, the touts would be pushing Lidiya Yankovskaya." -WBUR Russian-born symphonic and opera conductor Lidiya Yankovskaya's recent work has been hailed as “superb,” “expert,” and “coax[ing] every possible expressive note from the instrumentalists.” Recently named Music Director of...weiterlesen

Repräsentationsdetails:

TACT International Art Management
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  • Repertoire (25)
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Rezensionen

It is my pleasure to be back with a new performance review from the world class Seattle Opera. It has been fourteen months since I last set foot in McCaw Hall. It pains me to type that. Like many in the arts world, the pandemic turned everything upside down. The emotions, the withdrawals, and the like were all too real. The virtual experience will never replace the in-person event but it’s the way the world has pivoted during these unprecedented times. Having spent the last ten months in the virtual live-streaming world myself, with over 130 interview live-streams to my credit, I was overly excited to see how the production of “Don Giovanni” would transfer to the virtual world. It’s absolutely stunning. Stage Director Brenna Corner and Maestro Lidiya Yankovskaya have taken the beloved opera and turned it into a breathtaking virtual experience for 2021. When one attends the opera in person (which hopefully we all will be doing so again soon), you get one vantage point from your seat. With the virtual experience filming allows the viewer to not only see details but also a wide variety of perspectives from each character’s viewpoint.
Mark Sugiyama
The big joke in Mozart’s 1787 opera “Don Giovanni” — one which he and his librettist, Lorenzo Da Ponte, must have had a good laugh over — is that the title character, aka Don Juan, the great lover, never actually consummates any of the affairs he pursues. He’s thwarted again and again by his three intended targets — Donna Anna, Donna Elvira and Zerlina — and this is probably why they regarded it as a comedy (their term for it was dramma giocoso, roughly “playful drama”), even though it opens with a murder and ends with the Don being cast down to hell. A “comedy” about a compulsive seducer? That’s something any opera company has to treat pretty gingerly these days, and Seattle Opera’s new filmed performance, though skillful, tends to avoid rather than address Don Giovanni’s challenges. The performance, available for streaming (for $35) March 19-21 at seattleopera.org, is staged on a simple set, just one raised platform, with piano accompaniment by Jay Rozendaal and David McDade and the cast lip-syncing (quite well, but not flawlessly) to their prerecorded soundtrack conducted by Lidiya Yankovskaya. Ken Christensen’s black-and-white cinematography is both luscious and crisp, down to the glinting shine on the Don’s shoes, and filming enables a few neat tricks not possible in a stage production — for example, a close-up of the Don’s scrapbook of amorous conquests, full of sketches and keepsakes. This production, though, also cuts one full hour from “Don Giovanni’s” usual two-and-a-half-hour running time. Most of the recitatives — the half-spoken, half-sung dialogues that link one musical number to the next — are omitted, but plot points lost thereby are explained by captions, a canny solution. Also gone are large chunks of Mozart’s overture and both act finales, plus another half-dozen arias and ensembles altogether.
Gavin Borchert

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