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Biography  Soraya Mafi is a graduate of both the Royal Northern College of Music and the Royal College of Music. She is the winner of the 2016 Susan Chilcott Award – an award from the Susan Chilcott Scholarship to support a ‘major young artist with the potential to make an international impact’. Soraya is also an Associate of the RNCM, an...read more

Representation details:

Askonas Holt

Biography  Soraya Mafi is a graduate of both the Royal Northern College of Music and the Royal College of Music. She is the winner of the 2016 Susan Chilcott Award – an award from the Susan Chilcott Scholarship to support a ‘major young artist with the potential to make an international impact’. Soraya is also an Associate of the RNCM, an...read more

Representation details:

Askonas Holt
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  • Repertoire (18)
Composer & WorkRoleProductions
Britten
A Midsummer Night's DreamTytania1
Peter GrimesNiece I1
The Turn of the ScrewFlora1
Gluck
Orfeo ed EuridiceAmore1

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Reviews

The cast was the strongest I have seen for some time at the WNO. Soraya Mafi was an ebullient Susanna whose exquisite honeyed timbre (notably fine in the higher registers) was matched by her exceptional acting. The phrase “star quality” is scattered about too liberally, but Mafi really does deserve the label.
Alice Hughes
The cast was the strongest I have seen for some time at the WNO. Soraya Mafi was an ebullient Susanna whose exquisite honeyed timbre (notably fine in the higher registers) was matched by her exceptional acting. The phrase “star quality” is scattered about too liberally, but Mafi really does deserve the label. Anita Watson also excelled as the Countess: her moment of reflection in the aria “Dove sono” was one of the performances of the night, while Jonathan McGovern’s shrewd interpretation of the Count was dense but likeable rather than calculated philanderer, ripe for easy redemption. Anna Harvey brought a freshness to her Cherubino and has a clarity of voice that suits the role; her straightly delivered “Voi, che sapete” providing a teasing sweetness that is lost when overdone in a haze of vibrato. Leah-Marian Jones brought a note of depth to the cartoonish Marcellina: her switch from devilish conspirator to maternal benefactor at the discovery of her true relationship to David Ireland's Figaro was subtly moving: the pantomime dame made real, if only for the briefest of moments.
Alice Hughes

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