Search artist name

Biografie  Deborah Warner’s theatre credits include: The Good Person of Szechuan; Woyzeck; The Tempest; Measure for Measure; King Lear and Coriolanus (Kick Theatre Company); Titus Andronicus (Laurence Olivier and Evening Standard Awards for Direction), King John and Electra (RSC); The Good Person of Sichuan, King Lear, Richard II (French C...weiterlesen

Repräsentationsdetails:

Askonas Holt

Biografie  Deborah Warner’s theatre credits include: The Good Person of Szechuan; Woyzeck; The Tempest; Measure for Measure; King Lear and Coriolanus (Kick Theatre Company); Titus Andronicus (Laurence Olivier and Evening Standard Awards for Direction), King John and Electra (RSC); The Good Person of Sichuan, King Lear, Richard II (French C...weiterlesen

Repräsentationsdetails:

Askonas Holt
  • Alle Vorstellungen

maskVon Kulturinstitution / verifiziert durch Operabase

mask Von Künstler*in / Agent*in

m
 Matinée
t
 Tournee
c
 Konzert

mask Von Künstler*in / Agent*in

  • Repertoire (12)
Komponist*in & WerkRolleProduktionen
Bach,JS
Johannes-PassionStage director2
Beethoven
FidelioStage director7
Berg
WozzeckStage director1
Britten
Death in VeniceStage director6

Videos

Rezensionen

For the first time in almost twenty years, Benjamin Britten’s Billy Budd returns home to the Royal Opera House in this co-production with Rome and Madrid, directed by Deobrah Warner and designed by Michael Levine. This is a piece with some great main performances anchored in Jacques Imbrailo as Billy (which as a former Jette Parker Young Artist with the Royal Opera House this must have felt quite special). Brindley Sherratt as John Claggert steals every scene he is in, his voice is just velvet, full of menace and manipulation too, it is glorious to watch. Toby Spence as Captain Vere is an interesting one, his voice is good but I’m not sure about how the production presents him, he comes off as quite a weak character rather than as a strong captain who is stuck in impossible circumstances. Talking of Jette Parker Young Artists, Dominic Sedgwick as the novice’s friend (he gave the standout performances at last years’ JPYAP Summer performance and a brilliant turn in this years Katya Kabanova) gave a moving performance of ‘Come along kid’; his acting and his conviction, along with a strong melodic voice made it a stand out moment. Clive Bailey as Dansker, the loveable old man who is friends and trusted by everyone was a gem. This is quite a chorus-heavy opera and the ROH chorus pull it off wonderfully. Ivor Bolton as conductor made full use of the world-class orchestra of the Royal Opera House and gave Britten’s score everything that it’s got, the orchestra were, as usual, stunning. It has been far too long since Billy Budd has been on the Royal Opera House stage and this is a welcome return, you couldn’t ask for a better cast or orchestra to deliver it. The production is good but it is the performances and the stunning music which are what you’ll stay for. I hope it will return very soon.
Stuart Martin
Deborah Warner’s production comes to Covent Garden, London, from the Teatro Reale in Madrid, where it was premiered in 2016. The conductor, Ivor Bolton, as well as most of the all-male cast, have travelled with the production, too. muster scene at the beginning of the second act had seemed inert, never conveying the idea of a ship preparing for battle, though the singing of the chorus there and elsewhere is stirringly superb. Warner does add a few directorial glosses along the way, the most telling, perhaps, the clear disgust of the three officers at the court martial (David Soar’s Flint, Thomas Oliemans’s Redburn and Peter Kellner’s Ratcliffe) at Vere’s inability to intervene on Billy’s behalf when the death sentence is passed, though there’s little that sheds new light on one of Britten’s most conflicted operas. There is some magnificent singing – the implacable blackness of Claggart’s credo as Sherratt delivers it, Imbrailo’s beautifully modulated delivery of Billy’s final monologue in the darbies – and some crisply focused portrayals of the smaller roles, especially from Duncan Rock as Donald and Clive Bayley as Dansker. Bolton’s conducting has its moments too, but can never really compensate for the dramatic intensity and sense of involvement that the production is so slow to generate.
Andrew Clements

Kontakt

Häufig gestellte Fragen

  • Ich bin Künstler*inWie kann ich Vorstellungen, Repertoire, Fotos hinzufügen und meine persönlichen Kontaktinformationen verwalten? Klicken Sie hier
  • Ich bin Agent*inWie kann ich meine persönlichen und Büro-Kontaktdaten hinzufügen und meine Künstlerkartei aktualisieren? Klicken Sie hier
  • Ich bin eine Fachperson an einem Theater, Festival, OrchesterWie kann ich ein professionelles Besetzungswerkzeug verwenden? Klicken Sie hier
Künstler *innen erforschen